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March 6, 2017 YouTube Ads for Beginners: How to Launch & Optimize a YouTube Video Advertising Campaign

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You’ve spent months perfecting the script, storyboarding, finding the right talent, shooting, and editing. The end result? A blockbuster brand or product video.

With all that time invested, you can’t stop at just embedding the video on a homepage or sharing it on social media and hoping someone watches.

While great content is bound to be found, it’s also important to be proactive about gaining the attention of and educating prospects and those unfamiliar with your brand. Running a series of YouTube ads is one way to make sure more of your target audience finds the video content you’ve produced. And with new formats and tracking capabilities, you can also use this information to report on its ROI.

Download our free guide to learn how to create and utilize video in your marketing to increase engagement and conversion rates. 

The thing is, advertising on YouTube is very different from running a PPC or paid social campaign. There are specific creative constraints and a ton of options for this platform, and you need a base knowledge before you even scope out your next video project to make the most of the paid possibilities.

What’s New With YouTube Advertising

In January 2017, Google announced it would make changes to AdWords to allow advertisers to reach more viewers on YouTube — especially across mobile devices, where 50% of YouTube views take place. Among the changes it rolled out, possibly the biggest announcement was that advertisers will soon be able to target viewers based on their Google search history, in addition to their viewing behaviors YouTube was already targeting.

Marketers can now target ads at people who recently searched for a certain product or service to target the video ads they’ll be served on the platform. If the content of a video ad is closely related to a search the viewer has been researching, they might be more likely to watch the entire ad or click through the ad to the website.

Keywords are relatively less expensive to target on YouTube than in traditional Google Search: Views cost an average of $0.06 per click on YouTube, compared to the average Google Search cost per click, which is estimated to be between $1-2. When YouTube targeting includes search history, it may be a more cost-effective way to target your audience with a more engaging form of content — video.

The 2 Types of YouTube Video Ads

TrueView ads are the standard video ad type on YouTube. Advertisers only pay for TrueView ads when viewers watch or interact with their ad (for example, by clicking on a call-to-action), and videos can be easily customized to share a variety of content.

Advertisers only pay when a user watches the ad for at least 30 seconds or until the end of the video or if the viewer takes an action, such as clicking on a call-to-action. YouTube requires that skippable TrueView ads be 12-60 seconds in length and that non-skippable TrueView ads be 15-30 seconds in length.

There are two types of TrueView ads:

Video Discovery Ads (Previously Named In-Display Ads)

Video discovery YouTube ads show up on the YouTube homepage, search results pages, and as related videos on YouTube video watch pages.

These ads appeared after performing a YouTube search:

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This display ad appears as a related video on the right-hand video sidebar:

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Once a user clicks on the ad, the destination video page features a spot on the right-hand column where a companion banner display ad will appear.

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In-Stream Ads

TrueView in-stream ads play before someone watches the video they’ve selected on YouTube. Viewers sometimes have the option to skip the ad after watching it for five seconds. You can also make them play anywhere in the Google Display Network (GDN) — or sites that purchased Google video ad space.

In-stream ads let marketers customize video ads with different CTAs and overlay text, as highlighted in the skippable in-stream ad example below from Grammarly.

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Here’s what another skippable in-stream ad from Wix looks like. In this example, there’s another CTA from Wix on top of the right-hand video menu display:

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Some in-stream ads are non-skippable and can play before, mid-roll, or after the main video. Here’s an example of a non-skippable video ad before the main content on YouTube:

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There are also non-skippable, mid-roll video ads, which appear midway through a YouTube video that’s 10 minutes or longer in length.

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Source: PC Daily Tips

With TrueView, advertisers can gain a ton of information about the performance of their ads for optimization and testing purposes. AdWords provides data about completed views, partial views, if the video drives channel subscriptions, clickthrough rates on CTAs, views sourced from a user sharing the content, and views on the brand’s other content that can be attributed to a person initially viewing a video ad. These actions help advertisers better understand the full value of their video ad spend and where to allocate budget to increase results.

How to Set Up & Launch a YouTube Video Advertising Campaign

Once you’ve created a marketing video you want to advertise on YouTube, it’s time to create your video ad campaign. (If you haven’t made a video yet, here’s how to get started with Animoto or Wistia, along with a few great examples.) Then, upload your video to YouTube.

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Now, you’re ready to set up your advertising campaign. First, go to your Google AdWords account to set up your campaign.

Campaign Type

Tap the drop-down menu on the right-hand side of the red “+ Campaign” button on your Google AdWords homepage and select “video.”

Campaign Name

Enter a name for your campaign, and make sure Video has been chosen from the Type drop-down menu.

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Video Ad Format

Select “In-stream or video discovery ads” to ensure your video ad will be in TrueView format (in the style of the examples outlined above).

Budget

Set your budget per day. You can also select a delivery method — either the standard delivery, which shows ads evenly during the day, or accelerated delivery, which drives views as quickly as possible. The latter would be useful if you want to capitalize on a trend or news item relevant to your brand’s video.

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Networks

Decide where you want your ad to appear.

  • YouTube Search: Your video ad will appear in results for searches and will appear on the YouTube home page, channel pages, and video pages.
  • YouTube Videos: This runs TrueView ads that can appear in-display ads or in-stream ads. With this option, you can choose for your video ad to appear before or around videos shown across the Google Display Network.

You should create separate campaigns for YouTube Search and YouTube Video as this will help you to better track performance metrics. These ads are served to people performing very different activities and require a different amount of commitment from the viewer, so it’s best to monitor performance separately.

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Locations

Define the location of users whom you want the ad to be shown to. You can also exclude certain locations.

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Language, Device & Mobile Bidding

AdWords will let you specify the operating system, device, and carrier for more advanced targeting. This is especially useful for mobile app ads, and there’s an option to increase or decrease your bid based on if the video ad is shown to someone on a mobile device.

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Advanced Settings

With the advanced settings section, you can set begin and end dates for your campaign, create a custom schedule for when your video ad should be shown, and limit the daily impressions and views for users. This all helps you to get the most return for your ad spend.

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Creating the Video Ad Creative

Name your ad group, and then insert the YouTube link for the video you would like to run the ad for. You will then choose whether you want this to run as an in-stream ad or an in-display ad.

For in-display, you’ll need to include a title and short description, which is entered on two separate lines. Note: Titles are limited to 25 characters, and the description lines are limited to 35 characters each.

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In-stream ads provide you with the option to overlap a display URL on top of the video. You should use a vanity URL that directs to another final URL to make it more memorable. You can include advanced URL tracking options. In addition, a companion banner made from images from your video will appear on the right side of the video ad.

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Bidding

You’ll then determine the max price you will pay for each view, which you can adjust to increase the number of projected views your video may receive.

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Targeting

Finally, you can further define the audience you would like the video to be shown — options include gender, age, and parental status. You can also target individuals by their interests, such as beauty mavens, cooking enthusiasts, horror movie fans, etc. Try running multiple campaigns to target different groups of users to discover who is most engaged, rather than including everyone you want to target in one campaign.

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Advanced Targeting

You can also target individuals by keywords, topics, or websites where you would like your video ad to appear. Keyword targeting with in-display ads can be a powerful tool for finding individuals who are looking for a visual answer to a question. Be sure to do your research, and try testing out different groups of keywords to see which leads to more views, clicks, or conversions.

Additionally, you can use AdWords video ads to remarket to people who have been in contact with your brand already. This can help you to re-engage those who are already familiar with your brand.

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Linking Your Account

You should link your AdWords account to the YouTube channel where the video is hosted if you haven’t already. You can also click “finish” to begin running your video ad campaign.

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10 Tips for Optimizing Your AdWords for Video Ads

Launching a video ad campaign is a great step, but there are some things you should set up prior to starting to pay for views to make the most of your budget and to see the highest return for your client.

1) Define your metrics and goals.

When analyzing the results, there are four main categories of metrics you can track for each video. These are located under the “column” drop-down in your campaigns interface.

Views

Under the “views” category, you can better understand what percentage of the ad people viewed and understand how the ad drove earned views or views on your brand’s other videos.

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Audience

This category can be used to track likes and shares for each video ad.

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Branding

The view rate should signal if the creative and message are interesting or entertaining enough for people to watch the ad. By increasing your view-through rate (VTR), you will lower your cost per view.

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A List of Things Artificial Intelligence Will Not Replace

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Artificial intelligence has made an enormous impact on our lives, including behavioral algorithms, smart home technology, and self-driving cars. There is no doubt that AI will continue to advance and alter our world, but there is also no doubt that there are things it cannot and will not replace.

Relationships: You don’t have a relationship with Siri. Or Alexa. These two ladies don’t have any idea who you are. The possibility that humans will go from tribes that live, survive, and thrive together to helmets that live alone and shun other human beings is exceedingly small.

Caring: It will be a long time before artificial intelligence becomes conscious, if it ever makes the monumental, evolutionary leap that, so far, has occurred only in sentient beings, and mostly the human variety. Automation, when used as a substitute for human interaction, is the complete elimination of caring. It is an outsourcing of what should not be outsourced.

Inspiration: Human beings are inspiring and inspired. Artificial intelligence doesn’t make us feel anything. We are moved by human beings that exercise their compassion. We are inspired by those who achieve great feats, great works of art, and who sacrifice.

Wisdom: Artificial intelligence can beat world champions in the game of Chess and the infinitely complex Chinese game called Go. But it can’t tell you how to live a good life, how to discover your purpose, or what is the source of happiness. There is a difference between information and insight. Wisdom is not intelligence; it’s something more than that.

A Sense of Belonging: You are not among “your people” when you are surrounded by automatons and computers. You are among your people when you are around “your” people. You can’t replace the sense of being with the people with whom you belong. Friendship is going to be more valuable and more important in the future.

Shared Experiences: You are not going to take your artificial intelligence to dinner or on vacation to the south for France. You may let it assist in doing some of the planning.

Curiosity, Imagination, and Resourcefulness: These things are infinitely human. Artificial intelligence provides information. It will not replace human curiosity, imagination, or resourcefulness, something that the mind developed as a method of survival. Artificial intelligence doesn’t dream, but you do.

Desire: Artificial intelligence may help satisfy some desires, but it isn’t going to create it. That burning feeling in the pit of your stomach when you really want something—and the ability to create that desire—isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

Introducing Searching for Syria, a project made in partnership with UNHCR

It was six years ago in March that the Syrian civil war began, and since then more than five million people have been forced to leave their homes, their possessions, their families, and their education to seek shelter throughout the Middle East, Europe, and around the world. The scale of the crisis is hard for most of us to fathom, and the experiences of the refugee population can often feel too remote for most of us to understand.

Since 2015, we’ve tried to do our part to help. Google.org has invested more than $20 million in grants supporting solutions to provide 800,000+ refugees with emergency support and access to vital information and education.

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Today we are launching a site called “Searching for Syria,” a new way for people learn about Syria and the Syrian refugee crisis by exploring five of the most common search queries that people around the world are asking. Each question allows you to explore some of the detail behind the answer, combining UNHCR data with Google Maps, satellite imagery, videos, photography, and stories from refugees.

Each June the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) releases a Global Trends reportwhich contains the latest facts and figures on refugees, asylum-seekers, migrants and other people under the agency’s mandate. Late last year, Google and the UNHCR teamed up to combine this report with Search trends, drawing connections between the questions that people are searching for with the UNHCR’s detailed data sets. Our goal was to paint a new kind of picture of the Syrian refugee crisis, accessible to greater numbers of people—and in doing so, remind people not only of the scale of the crisis, but also of the human side of it.

We see through Google Search trends that people are certainly trying to understand the scale of the crisis. Among the top trending searches in Germany, France, and the UK last year was “What is happening in Syria?” and simply, “What is a refugee?” People in every corner of the world are turning to Google Search to  find out what’s going on and how they might help. In 2016 alone people searched for information about Syria and the Syrian people over tens of millions of times.

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Over the last six years we have seen Search trends from around the world shift from  immediate questions like, “Where are Syrian refugees going?” to the more contemplative, “What was Syria like before the war?” Throughout Searching for Syria, refugee families tell you about their homes six years ago and today—and what they’ve experienced in traveling to their new, temporary lives.

People search for many reasons—to learn and to research, or sometimes to connect, share, and overcome. Sharing these trends, based on UNHCR’s verified data, will ensure that people searching to better understand one of the most terrible events of the last six years will be able to do just that.

Your Google Assistant is getting better across devices, from Google Home to your phone

Last year we announced our vision for the Google Assistant—which helps you get things done through a natural conversation, and is available wherever you need it. Since launching the Assistant last fall, we’ve been improving what it can do for you—from adding the ability to control more smart home devices with your Assistant on Google Home and Android phones to bringing your Assistant to new surfaces like Android Wear. And today, we’re introducing new ways your Assistant can help you do even more.

Ready to help

Of course your Assistant can help answer your questions and find information—but it can also help you get all kinds of useful things done. Today we’re adding a few more:

  • Schedule new calendar appointments and create reminders. Starting today on Google Home, you can schedule appointments and soon you’ll also be able to add reminders. Since it’s the same Google Assistant across devices, you’ll be able to get a reminder at home or on the go.
  • Make your home smarter. We now have 70+ smart home partners supporting the Google Assistant across Google Home and Android phones, including August locks, TP-Link, Honeywell, Logitech, and LG.

On Google Home, hands-free help is just an “Ok Google” away. Here are some of the new things you can do with the Google Assistant in your home:

  • Make hands-free calls with Google Home. In the coming months, just ask your Assistant and it will connect you to mobile phones or landlines in the U.S. or Canada, free. There’s no setup and no need for a phone or additional app. And since we now support multiple people on one Google Home, your Assistant can make sure that you call your mom—not your partner or roommate’s mom!
  • Enjoy more music, movies and TV shows. You can soon use Spotify’s free music offering, as well as Soundcloud and Deezer, with Google Home. We’re also adding Bluetooth support to Google Home, so you can play any audio from your iOS or Android device. For streaming video lovers, we’ve already added Netflix, and we have more partners on the way like HBO NOW, CBS All Access, and HGTV.
  • Get visual responses from the Assistant on your TV with Chromecast. Later this year, we’ll add visual responses from your Assistant on TVs with Chromecast. You’ll be able to see Assistant answers on the biggest screen in your house, whether you’re asking “what’s on YouTube TV right now?” or “what’s on my calendar today?”

Plus, starting today developers can build conversational apps for the Google Assistant on phones. That means that soon you’ll be able to not only get help and answers from Google, but also from third party services.

Conversational

Your Assistant is also continually getting better at having a natural conversation. Almost 70 percent of requests to the Assistant are expressed in natural language, not the typical keywords people type in a web search. And many requests are follow-ups that continue an ongoing conversation.

But conversations can take place in many different ways. Sometimes your Assistant should be the one to start it—so over the next few months, we’re bringing proactive notifications to Google Home. Additionally, a conversation might not always be spoken out loud. So we’re adding new ways to help you have a conversation with your Assistant that’s right for you and the moment.

Starting today, you can also type to your Google Assistant on phones. And for when you want to see what you’ve previously asked, we’ll also soon add history within your conversation.

And in the coming months, with Google Lens—a new way for computers to “see”—you’ll be able to learn more about things around you, and even take action based on your surroundings, while you’re in a conversation with your Assistant. If you see a marquee for your favorite band, you can hold up your Assistant, tap the Lens icon and get information on the band, tickets and more.

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Rules of Direct Response Marketing

If you’re in the Direct Response Marketing game, and you’re not already asking yourself, “what can I do to increase revenue FAST?” every minute of the day, then I urge you to continue reading.

Freelance direct response copywriter Dean Rieck says: “Response is one of the five keys of successful direct marketing. And if you have that, the other four don’t matter.

Simply put, Direct Response Marketing is designed to provoke an IMMEDIATE response from the customer, through clear CTAs (calls to action) and other techniques, in order to generate reactions and feedback while encouraging decision-making.

That’s all well and good, and to be honest it’s pretty self-explanatory, right?

Which is why we at GKIC make it our aim to arm marketers with every single tool they need to market efficiently, because although this process sounds simple enough, the ins and outs can actually be quite challenging.

Generating a direct response from consumers isn’t as easy as it sounds. Sure, lots of people are taken in by mediocre advertising, but if you REALLY want to make the big bucks then you need to master the following 10 rules (outlined by our founder Dan Kennedy in his book,

No B.S. Direct Marketing- The Ultimate No Holds Barred Kick Butt Take No Prisoners Direct Marketing For Non-Direct Marketing Businesses’).

Psychology Tricks That Can Positively Influence Your Ideal Customer

Writing copy to boost conversions is not something that comes easily without practice.

There are a number of things to consider when undergoing the task of writing copy. And the things outlined in this week’s post are NOT necessarily things you may have considered before…

Let’s talk about psychology-based copywriting tips. Tips that make your words latch onto your reader’s subconscious, which solidify the connection between you as you become the best provider of the solution to their problem… and thus the only logical choice.

First of all, your copy needs to be coherent. That’s a given. However, to make sure your words and syntax tally up to keep the reader interested and your connection strong, you need to include things I like to call ‘Coherence Flags’.

 

Generate More Sales With Less Staff

We’ve seen a changing landscape in the foodservice and retail industry; labor costs are gradually increasing, automated technology is becoming less expensive, and customers are becoming more technologically sophisticated. This leaves opportunity for businesses to differentiate themselves in the market and maintain their labor costs.

The catalyst to this new found opportunity? Technology. By implementing technology into your business you can generate more sales with less staff, without having to compromise the customers’ experience.

  • Self-Service Kiosks
  • Online Ordering